YouTube tests 5 unskippable ads: Will users be ‘forced’ to watch more ads?

Tech News


YouTube, a video streaming platform, is reportedly planning to place five ads on a video which will be unskippable. The platform is currently testing this feature to make it a reality soon. At the moment, YouTube shows only two unskippable ads which is still fine for a free user. But, it seems that five ads have irked many, as several users have expressed their disappointment on Twitter.

After receiving the tweets on long ads, YouTube tweeted stating that this will not happen with all the videos and that the ads would not be very long. The video streaming platform has confirmed that each ad will be only six seconds long and not more than that. It basically suggests that if there are five ads, then an individual will have to wait for approximately 30 seconds to continue watching a video on YouTube.

YouTube tweeted, “This may happen with a certain type of ad format called bumper ads, since they are only up to 6 seconds long. If you’d like, you can send feedback directly from YouTube via the send feedback tool.”

In order to watch any video without ads, users can use Chrome’s ad blocker extension on their desktop. Secondly, users can spend money on YouTube’s subscription and avail some extra benefits as well.

Meanwhile, in a recent development, YouTube has announced that it will offer a stripped-down version of its site tailored for schools and colleges, in an attempt to establish itself in the digital education tools market, even as it introduces new features for creators and institutions using the platform for educational content.

YouTube is introducing Player for Education and Courses, which is a feature that will let video creators offer online classes for a fee or free of charge. According to The Verge report, YouTube has announced new tools for creators making educational content on the platform, which include ways to charge viewers for their videos. Interestingly, beginning next year, certain creators will be able to make free or paid “courses,” with playlists of videos set up for audiences, according to The Verge report. “If a viewer buys a course, they’ll be able to watch the content ad-free and play the videos in the background. Courses will come to the US and South Korea first in beta,” The Verge report said.

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